Cellarmanship (7th Edition)

 

  • Seventh edition of this classic CAMRA publication.

  • Essential advice for anyone training to work in a pub cellar, planning a beer festival or serving real ale at a celebration.

  • Clear and concise technical advice, complete with more than 30 informative illustrations and diagrams.

  • Useful and comprehensive glossary of terms.

  • The last word on storing, keeping and serving real ale.

  • Pull out poster included

  • Available on Kindle >>

£12.99

288 in stock

About The Author

Patrick O'Neill

Patrick O'Neill studied physics and spent more than 30 years working as an engineer in the electronics industry. His science and engineering experience proved useful in running CAMRA beer festivals and, for several decades, the bar and cellar of a busy Private Members' Club, and this book was produced as a result of that experience. The technical aspects of making, keeping and selling beer have always been of consuming interest to him.

With increased numbers of people trying and producing real ale, there’s never been a better time to master how to keep, store and serve cask ale. In a fully revised and updated edition of this CAMRA classic, Patrick O’Neill explains all you need to know about running a good cellar and ensuring that the pint you serve does both pub and brewer proud. Cellarmanship is a must-have book if you are a professional in the drinks trade. Patrick O’Neill shares decades of experience, detailed technical expertise and a lifetime of passionate enthusiasm for real ale. Step-by-step instructions, concise knowledge and interesting anecdotes make this a book to keep and refer to time and time again.

Patrick O’Neill studied physics and sent more than 30 years working as an engineer in the electronics industry. His science and engineering experience proved useful in running CAMRA beer festivals and for several decades the bar and cellar of busy Private Members Club.

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